Lots of good conclusions from the Hybrid Cloud panel at Interop; too many to see on one slide, so here they are.

  • Hybrid isn’t one app in two places; it’s internal and external apps talking to one another
  • Migrating for new apps is easy; for already deployed ones, it’s much harder
  • In the new world, the developers are the admins and ops toolsets are changing
  • The 2010 platform will be
    • Infrastructure-aware; parallel; split between dev and ops
    • Not really PaaS; but not IaaS either
    • Runs both in-house and externally
  • Increased focus on making it easy for developers to transition to on-demand environments
  • Portability becomes a bigger concern (in/out and between clouds)
  • Where enterprises will initially embrace it:
    • Collaboration, messaging, things “just above” infrastructure
    • Areas that don’t add strategic value
    • Leverage utility model of what’s there now (apps with inherent burstability)
  • Ideological battle in infrastructure
    • Bottoms-up focus on primitives (storage, queue, compute); we build things from easy-to-connect, RESTful functions
    • Top-down modelled approach, which we reduce down to the underlying patterns and can generate code from them (policies, etc.)
  • Growth of 2 kinds of technologies
    • That make this easier for developers (Ruby on Rails) ➜ This will win
    • That help to migrate legacy systems into cloud-compatible containers
  • Enterprises about 5-7 years behind consumer/public Internet (Web tech, Hadoop, enterprise mashups)
  • Let us not forget: All big web businesses use a ton of Oracle
  • Huge $ to be made solving enterprise migration: Discrete components or specific apps
  • Standardization is 15% of the problem; standards bodies are still arguing taxonomies
  • Internet standards are built on rough consensus and running code; whoever produces a useful product that is available to many people quickly will win